The Art Of Cooling: Industrial Style

Everyone’s experienced the effect age can have on a computer’s cooling system, often resulting in overheating and loud fans. Of course, though, these problems are usually as the result of simple issues like dust or component malfunction and are relatively easy to fix. When it comes to truly difficult cooling jobs, data and server centres tend to have it the hardest. The tech behind keeping these places chilled is quite fascinating. So, to help you to understand it, this post will be going through the options on the cutting edge.


Everyone’s experienced the effect age can have on a computer’s cooling system, often resulting in overheating and loud fans. Of course, though, these problems are usually as the result of simple issues like dust or component malfunction and are relatively easy to fix. When it comes to truly difficult cooling jobs, data and server centres tend to have it the hardest. The tech behind keeping these places chilled is quite fascinating. So, to help you to understand it, this post will be going through the options on the cutting edge.

The biggest cooling challenge engineers have when designing a data centre, server room, or supercomputer is the machines themselves. Being largely self-contained, as well as being hidden in racks, it can be hard to find cooling which works. A great example of cutting-edge cooling technology can be found in Canada’s new Cedar supercomputer. This machine largely relies on phase-change cooling, using jets of water to cool gasses down so that they can become liquids and be reheated. Achieving a previously unheard of efficiency score, this is truly a feat of cold engineering.

Of course, not a lot of companies have the resources to build a fully-custom system for their servers. Instead, a variety of other methods can be used to make a room full of machines a little bit cooler. Older and smaller places will often use air-cooling, relying on fans to do the work. In higher-performance systems, water cooling will often be used, offering a much more efficient option than air. Along with both of these, you’ll also find air conditioning, as they need cold air around them to operate.

Not all components in a server or computer system can have their own fan, water block, or radiator. Instead, some have to rely on the air around them to stay cool. In most cases, these will be some of the hottest parts of the machine, and they have to be ready to deal with the heat. You can find options for an industrial temp 2.5 SSD, passively cooled power supplies, and loads of other components which don’t have to have special methods to keep them chilled. Of course, though, the case the machine is in will also make a huge difference.

Regardless of the surrounding climate, almost all server buildings are bound to generate heat. Letting this heat simply dissipate into the air is a waste, though, as it can be used for a lot more. Some companies use the heat generated from their machines to keep their buildings warm. Others, with complex setups at their disposal, will convert this heat back into electricity, using it in other areas. Getting a return from something like this makes the costs of running a business in this area a lot cheaper.

This post should give you a good insight into the wonderful world of industrial cooling. As time goes on, the methods being used to keep machines like this chilled are getting better and better. Of course, though, there’s only so much that can be done while we’re still using conductors which aren’t perfect.
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